Tag Archives: art

Tordstock 200 År

Tordstock 200….

Words to describe this experience…hmmm. It’s tough. A music festival? A camping adventure? A birthday party for 5 Swedish guys all turning 40 (hence the “200” in the festival name)? All of that, yes, but most importantly to me, it was an almost indescribable weekend of witnessing and participating in the beauty of relationships – a celebration held and attended by a community of friends that rivaled, if not exceeded, anything I’ve ever experienced in my life before.

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A little background: My San Diego/Swedish friend Karin has a whole group of close friends back in Sweden, of course, and on the agenda for our trip was this huge birthday weekend for 5 of her good friends who were all turning 40 this year. They had been preparing this event for months and it involved music, stages, grills, hot tubs, campfires, beer, tents, and people – lots of people.

One of the birthday guys has a lovely, rather rural piece of property and had cleared out a gorgeous little plot in the middle of the woods. By the time we Americans showed up (a day early to hang out and help with the last minute prep), there were already multiple booths, stages, grills, hottubs, etc set up. I was extremely impressed! We jumped right in with helping set up tents, make food, test out the beer selection and pretty much laugh our guts out in between the welcoming hugs and extensions of love and friendship.

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The first night  we spent at Karin’s best friend’s home with his lovely family. Omg. The sweetest little family in the world. The next day was unofficially a bit of a more intimate gathering I suppose – which was great for us newbies because we got to meet and get to know some people before the huge Saturday crowd showed up. I think we Americans established ourselves as the master grillers – We really had a blast helping out with everything. It took me right back to the good ol days of my past manning the grill for 1-200 people. Pounds and pounds of Bacon, eggs, hotdogs, hamburgers. Even the Freddie Special (don’t ask…;)

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Ryan manned the woodfired hot tubs! So fun! I guess this is a sorta popular/common thing in Sweden to rent these portable hot tubs. Im so impressed by the lovely portable items you can bring to these festivals – even the mobile port-a-potties were heated and lit. I almost camped out in one it got so cold the first night! J Probably the most impressive piece of equipment was the grill. Johan – who is a genius with his hands – designed and built the one we used. I want one.

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We stayed up till the wee hours of the morning singing and talking around the campfire, hollering out both Swedish and English tunes even if we could only join in in the “lah lah lah’s” of the chorus… Those who know me know that I am quite obsessed with campfires – some of my favorite memories involve friends and campfires and nights under the stars… I was pretty much in Heaven soaking it all in and enjoying the music and keeping the fire stoked. 🙂 We Even busted out another batch of grilled hotdogs at 2AM for those who had worked up an appetite (again)!

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Karin is friends with a rather well-know European musician named “Yellow Mike” and she had secretly arranged with him to stop over on his way up to Oslo for a surprise concert – it was completely amazing. We loved it – his stage presence and music were stellar and it was so kind of him to swing by for a couple hours and honor us with his time and music.

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One of the birthday guys’ brothers has been in a band since 1978. They were the main presenters of the weekend and, gosh, do these guys rock. They sound SO great and filled the woods with such an epic mix of popular songs – both Swedish and English. We stayed up through most of the nights too, just singing around the campfire and enjoying these perfect moments in time.

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So, this is really just barely scratching the surface of an outstanding weekend, but hopefully the pictures will help bring it all together. I know I made some epic memories – the love and laughter, the fun and music, the bonding. I was so touched by the palpable love most of all. There was no holding back on hugs and kisses. You could see, touch, feel and were basically immersed in a mileau of deep comraderie and could clearly see the affection that these special group of friends shared. I feel deeply honored to have been not only invited to share in the activies but to be welcomed warmly into those bonds of friendship.   Thank you from the bottom of my heart to all of you lovely Swedes. I really do miss you.

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Time for Magic

“Here ends another day, during which I have had eyes, ears, hands and the great world around me. Tomorrow begins another day. Why am I allowed two?”

G.K. Chesterton

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That is one of my favorite quotes… and exactly how I feel. My heart has been bursting with happiness – really – since moving to San Francisco, and I am frankly shocked. I did not expect to feel this way nor to feel so absolutely excited every day. It is not just that there is a bazillion things to do and see, but the inexplicable way that magic keeps happening in the form of random happenings, job, housing, beauty, making new friends and renewing old relationships, etc…

Specific happenings:

Job at UCSF. No sooner had I returned from SEA than this amazing contract kinda fell into my lap – 12 hr DAYS, immediate start date, great rate. So far, its been a busy, but very positive experience. Everyone is super nice, the facility is in a lovely area overlooking the city and the bay, and for the first time in my career, I actually have hour long lunch breaks. Whaaattt?!? Kinda still in shock, but, hey! I’ll take it! Read, walk, exercise, sleep…the 60 min options are limitless 🙂

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thot this was sweet…two men and a baby out enjoying the gardens. My hospital in the background.

Probably the funniest thing that’s happened yet relates to the navy blue scrub dress code for the nurses. Till my new scrubs come in, I’ve been making do with some old navy scrubs I “borrowed” months ago from a couple outpatient centers in SD including for some reason an enormous pair of drawstring pants. Well, I tried to cinch them tight but apparently, bustling around they just kept getting looser and looser. A little hitch here and there seemed to do the trick until, well, it just didn’t….mid-patient care I suddenly looked down and realized my pants were riding about mid-thigh. How long they had been that way, I can only guess. I just couldn’t stop laughing. I don’t think my sweet patient noticed (thank God) but the caregiver in the room sure did. We both lost it a bit. Fortunately I was wearing some stretch pants underneath to keep warm so didn’t quite scandalize the unit, but needless to say I can’t wait till some more flattering scrubs arrive!

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pretty cool view

Housing/roommates. San Francisco is quite possibly the most expensive US city to live in, making it difficult to find an acceptably affordable place in any decent part of the city. I basically had just a few days to try to find a place…and its crazy how this all has worked out. I randomly emailed my photography teacher from up here asking if she had any leads for me. Just so happened she and her husband had an amazing available room for a temporary place for as long as I needed (its so great to have roommates my age) and a hilarious cat named Connor who is so funny. And now I’ve found a fantastic more permanent place in Cole Valley – an 8 min walk to work!! With another great roommate and a dog! Absolutely love Cole Valley! One of the best parts of the city to live in: old lovely houses, safe neighborhood abounding in restaurants and coffee shops, ice cream parlor;), stores, parks, super easy transit to anywhere in the city, a stones throw from weird and cool Haight Street! Already in love.

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always wanted some tomato soup shoes…

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there’s just no explanation for some things on Haight Street. Its so cool though…happy hour in a hat shop? whaat? love it. music, shoes, bars, costumes…

Random SF explorations. Uber pool! Really fun! For just $5 you can grab a Uber and go anywhere in the city with the stipulation that you may have to pool up with someone going in your direction. I’ve honestly had a great time meeting people and the drivers are fun to talk to as well.

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one of my besties up for a visit! nail and massage time!

Golden Gate Park, museums, windy beaches, art, et al. So much culture and beauty up here. This is a great place for an art and nature lover. Already been to an exhibit at deYoung, prowled around art exhibits and talked to a number of ridiculously talented artists, wandered lazily through botanical garden and had some fun practicing street photography and capturing people and scenes that caught my eye.

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enjoying a sandwich…

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music student from chicago out enjoying the sunshine like the rest of us

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cuz, really, why not…

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these two ladies have been fast friends for literally decades…welcomed me warmly to the city.

Public transit. OhEmGee…this girl is SO unused to having to take buses… but I jumped right into it out of sheer necessity. (parking is $30/day at UCSF) I have had some moments of utter frustration, sheer stupidity, disgust and defeat, but all in all have been rather proud of my navigational abilities and have utilized the somewhat unpredictable but none-the-less supportable MUNI quite frequently. Can’t wait to just be able to walk to work though!

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a little bus stop romance…they could probably get a room at booking.com if they wanted…just saying

Just for laughs…almost unbelievable:  http://www.upout.com/blog/san-francisco-3/the-15-most-wtf-moments-of-san-francisco-public-transportation?utm_source=UpOutSF+Weekly+Newsletters&utm_campaign=8f49959d80-UpOutSF_Weekender_2_19_2015_Thursday&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_54b38fbfbf-8f49959d80-73710529

Restaurants, indoor miniature golf, starry hills at night, brunches with friends, super nice people…I feel blessed and spoiled and happy. Yes. I. Do. I knew 2015 was going to be good…

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…reflection experimentation…

“One of the deepest and strangest of all human moods is the mood which will suddenly strike us perhaps in a garden at night, or deep in sloping meadows, the feeling that every flower and leaf has just uttered something stupendously direct and important, and that we have by a prodigy of imbecility not heard or understood it. There is a certain poetic value, and that a genuine one, in this sense of having missed the full meaning of things. There is beauty, not only in wisdom, but in this dazed and dramatic ignorance.”

Phnom Penh to Kanchanaburi

“Though we travel the world over to find the beautiful, 

we must carry it with us or we find it not.” Ralph Waldo Emerson

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You wouldn’t believe the atmosphere of where I’m (finally) writing up my first blog from Asia: a little floating hostel in Kanchanaburi right on the banks of the famous River Kwai, sipping on Singha beer and feasting on homemade spicy Thai food while chatting up a couple other guests from California, of all places!

I probably need to back up a bit though…I have almost two weeks of catching up to do – solo traveling can be rather mentally and emotionally exhausting and blogging was the first thing to go. However, I keep getting repeated requests for updates so I am definitely attempting to give it a go here!

I spent the first 24 hours in Phnom Penh quite sick from my previous Mexico trip, emerging only once from my room to obtain some much needed Gatorade and medicine! Enough said about that. Phnom Penh I found to be quite dirty, busy, noisy but there seems to be some attraction for expats as there are quite a number of them there. While it IS the capital of Cambodia, there really isn’t that much to see or do there as a tourist. A few highlights from my time there included the following:

  • a really great cooking class (complete with an AM visit to the market to collect ingredients, lovely international fellow students)
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We learned how to make “amok” – a very traditional fish dish of ginger, lemongrass, mashed up spices, and egg – all steamed together in a banana leaf bowl. Delicious!!

  • an open air jeep ride and tour to a wildlife preserve (tons of creepy monkeys, native Cambodian deer, crocodiles, otters, tigers and other endangered species),
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feeding little fish to this very greedy otter

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okay, this is pretty cute but I still think monkeys are quite awful and unpredictable little beasts

  • and a private guided tour through the infamous Tuol Sleng Genocide museum and the horrificChoeung Ek Killing Fields
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20,000 men, women and children were brutally tortured and murdered at this former Phnom Penh hi-school during the Khmer rouge regime. Hard to even fathom such evil. How is it possible that humans can really do this to other humans…?!?

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  • the delights of eating delicious (and cheap!) Cambodian street food

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I’ll admit, this night wasn’t street food. celebrating Christmas at a rooftop bar overlooking the river.

Much more could be said about each of these activities but perhaps more detail is better for further posts when I can sort through my pictures and reflect.

Siem Reap was AMAZING and I loved it so much better than Phnom Penh! It is open and clean (er) and magical with so much to do and see and explore!

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I had such a lovely lovely time there I almost get shivers thinking about it! I shall DEFINITELY save all my adventures and pictures for another post (double procrastination at its finest…) but to highlight my time there,

  • I went on an absolutely FANTASTIC offroading cycling tour through the Angkor area, getting off the beaten path and visiting non-touristy temples, and basically having the time of my life with the coolest tour group ever: two British girls (whom I ended up hanging out with the rest of my time there), Candadian couples, a German.

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  • Tour of the floating villages and forest,
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there really are no words that do justice to how mesmerizingly enchanting and magical this was…just looking back at pictures has me transported back to fairy land.

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i took many more pictures of this unique river village but it is getting quite late so I will be posting more as i can!! it was such an incredible day of flavors (snake! and sun baked baby mussel) , sights, sounds, encounters

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  • facial and 90 min foot massage at lovely prices,
  • super interesting tour of a silk factory!! from start to finish…poor little silk worms.  cannot BELIEVE the work that goes into handcrafted silk material

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  • insane NYE countdown on the famous Pub Street.
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countdown!! grabbed drinks at an Irish pub (?!) with the Brits, a couple newly arrived and jet lagged American guys and a couple Japanese gals. down in the street was not my scene… I think that was my first time being showered with booze! At least no one got trampled here as far as i know! Cambodians DO love their NY celebrations!

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world famous bar on Pub Street

Anyway, my other lovely cycling compatriots talked up the glories of Thailand, so I spontaneously booked a flight into Bangkok, where I arrived yesterday and stayed for just one night. This morning I absolutely reveled in ART!! There is a relatively brand new contemporary art museum there (took me literally interviewing SIX taxi drivers to successfully get there. Seriously, NONE of them know how to read a map!!!) but it was well worth the effort. I photographed some of my favorite pieces. Some of them so bizarrely beautiful with Very different Thai flavor of course to most of it.

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This afternoon I railed it out here to Kanchanaburi – a 3rd class ticket on an ancient train. Seemed straight out of a turn of the century British film – corrugated metal shacks so close I could touch them with my fingers, branches whipping by the windows, near-fluorescent green rice fields, towering palm trees and sunlit hills. I felt newly strong and beautiful and happy gazing out the windows at it all, the wind in my face. And now, here I am, enjoying the night river air, good company, background Thai soap opera, and excited about tomorrow’s adventures: waterfalls, elephants, caves, and bridges!

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And now I shall attempt to insert some photos…the picky artistic side of me is loathe to include unedited versions but above are a few – some just from my iPhone.  Enjoy! and my love to you from Southeast Asia!

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Art and Social Consciousness

My final project in my Art Appreciation coursework was to create a thematic exhibit of several pieces of artwork and had to include art across different time periods, cultures and continents.  Each piece had to include a description of why I chose it and how it fit into the exhibit.  I thought you all might have some enjoyment walking through my little exhibit.  I love art and I love learning about it so I had a great time researching and putting it together.

Thematic Exhibition on Art and Social Consciousness

“Social conscience: the ability to reflect on deeply held

opinions about social justice and sustainability.”

Myshele Goldberg

 While “social consciousness” initially appears to be a much more modern theme that is more easily found today in venues from memorials to sculptures, posters and paintings, street art and gardens, it is, necessarily, a theme that we find in art going back in time hundreds and even thousands of years.   The human soul always has longed to be able to express its deepest thoughts and passions through art. One of the most powerful tools of connection, art – through writing, music, canvas – has given us, as a species, a method of relaying the profundities of the life and society that is around and inside us.

The following pieces of art all present a theme of social consciousness seen through specific lenses of justice and law, environmental awareness and responsibility, war and its aftermath of desolation, healthcare and suffering, discrimination and genocide.

This exhibition has a seemingly somewhat dark theme, but it is my wish that the viewer leave with his or her soul moved by reflection and hope. Hope that as dark as periods in our history have been, we are learning from those mistakes and making changes for our societies and our world. As long as artists are allowed the freedom to express their consciousness to and about society, we will continue to have an opportunity to seek a better present and future for our world.

Law Code Stele of King Hammurabi (1780 BCE)

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While this may piece of art may seem like a contradiction, when one thinks about art as “social protest” or “social consciousness” or a “memorial or remembrance” against government injustices or political forays or destructive wars and rulers, this stone actually represents a move towards freedom in society: the freedom to not have laws and rulership arbitrary and nebulous. The laws carved out here, yes, seem brutal, perhaps, (“an eye for an eye”) but no longer is action and punishment, consequences and crime left up to moods and whims, subterfuge and scheming, but on a “constitution” of sorts. (Tran, M., 2014). Freedom without laws is really just the worst sort of slavery.

Fever Van by L.S. Lowry (1935).

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“Fever Van” is included in this exhibition as a moving witness of the never-ending issues of healthcare that confront every modern society and country on earth. Birth, life, sickness, death, compassion, money, politics: all are always inevitable involved. This picture depicts the then current practice in Britain, of forcibly taking away a child with an infectious disease to an “isolation hospital” from which they had little chance of ever coming home. (Martin, C., 2013). Lowry is famous for his depictions of the deplorable state of healthcare at that time and his art serves as a reminder for us of the continued need for social reform in this area.

Guernica by Pablo Picasso (1937)

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A contemporary of L.S. Lowry, Picasso became also moved and inflamed by social events surrounding him during the early 20th century. Though specific interpretation of the symbols and images are, in typical Picasso fashion, left up to the viewer to interpret, “Guernica” was an outraged expressionistic response following the bombing of a little town in Spain that left more than 1,000 people dead.   General Franco allowed the German and Italians to bomb Guernica in a hideous experiment to “learn about the psychological effects of air warfare.” (DeWitte, D.J., Larmann, R.M., & Shields, M.K., 2012).

Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe by Peter Eisenman (2004)

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Last year, I had the privilege and grave honor of viewing this memorial in Berlin. It is a moving experience to walk through the 2,711 tomb-like structures and contemplate both what the tragic events that the Memorial stands for and what the artist was trying to convey with both the lack and the extremes of symmetry. Like Picasso’s “Guernica,” Eisenman wanted the viewer to interpret the memorial as he or she wishes, and, indeed, many different conclusion have been drawn from viewing and experiencing this memorial of remembrance. Though the article is a general criticism of the memorial, I found the following paragraph written by Richard Brody in The New Yorker particularly expressive of this piece of art:

“…In the shallow corner of the plaza, tourists sit and chat on bench-high stelae, children climb, all enjoy wide-open and thrillingly grand perspectives on the surroundings, including the Tiergarten to the west, and the installation takes on the cast of an austerely modern yet pleasantly welcoming park. But, upon entering the narrow alleys and plunging between higher and higher slabs, perspectives are sliced to a ribbon, other visitors are cut off from view, and an eerie claustrophobia sets in—even as some visitors (not just kids) play little games of hide-and-seek in the rectilinear maze. And the title, striking against the experience, creates sparks of metaphorical extrapolation: The Jews of Europe lived carefree, as in a park, until they wandered into frightening canyons of shadows from which the escape routes were narrow and distant. Yet, even then, amidst terrors and dangers, children played and families cohered, citizens from whose midst neighboring Jews were deported and slaughtered continued to frolic with indifference, exactly as many living in relative comfort do nowadays while political depravities are inflicted daily on far too many in places around the world. When my family and I got back to the bench-high stelae, I, too, sat down and checked messages.”

Cry Freedom (1987)

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This film about apartheid is based on the true story of a South African, black activist, Stephen Biko, and an American, white, liberal journalist. Though there are many films and documentaries made about the issues, times, and people of apartheid in South Africa, I chose this film to be a part of this exhibit both because of the accessibility of the film for viewers and the superb personal stories and acting. I believe that films have ways of raising social awareness that other art cannot as easily. By combining art forms and the ability to capture movement and scenes, film uses our combined senses to emote a response that lingers in one’s mind and heart.

Street Art by “July i”

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On a lighter note, this last piece in my exhibition, reminds us of the issues surrounding us today regarding the environment: pollution and waste are real and we are well-served to remember that each of us can do something about it in our every-day lives. “July i” is an anonymous street artist that in provocative and mostly amusing ways, hones our attention to the beauties and inconsistencies surrounding us. Street art is a valuable form of expression in our communities today and serves to remind us of not only our responsibilities but our connectedness to each other.

Robert Kennedy said,

“Each time a man stands up for an ideal, or acts to improve the lot of others, or strikes out against injustice, he sends forth a tiny ripple of hope and crossing each other from a million different centers of energy and daring, those ripples build a current that can sweep down the mightiest walls of oppression and resistance.”  

Art is one of the most powerful ways of expressing this. As one of my good friends once said, “Art is only good if it moves you somehow.” I hope that you, the viewer of this exhibit, have been moved in some way and are inspired to send out “ripples of hope” into your communities.

References

DeWitte, D.J., Larmann, R.M., & Shields, M.K. (2012). Gateways to art.    New York, New York: Thames & Hudson Inc.

Tran, M. (2014). Ancient Babylonian art shows the origins of justice.                   State Press Magazine. Retrieved from                                                                     http://www.statepress.com/2014/01/29/ancient-art-shows-     the-origins-of-justice/

Martin, C. (2013). Art with a social conscience. The Lancet, volume 382   (issue 9895). Retrieved from                                                                                       http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(13)61850-4/fulltext

Brody, R. (2012). The inadequacy of Berlin’s “Memorial to the        murdered Jews of Europe.” The New Yorker. Retrieved from http://www.newyorker.com/the-front-row/the-inadequacy-of-   berlins-memorial-to-the-murdered-jews-of-europe